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I think I may be depressed


People with depression don’t all experience the exact same symptoms. The common thread for people experiencing depression is that they struggle with a low mood mostly all day, every day for more than two weeks, maybe for months. If you have a down mood that never lifts and seems to impact most, if not all, of your activities of daily living (school, work, etc.), strains your relationships and takes a toll on your physical well-being, you may be dealing with depression. People who have depression just can’t “snap out of it.”

Here are some signs that you may be experiencing depression:

  • Feeling sad, blue, down or irritable or blah/flat most of the day, nearly every day
  • Difficulty sleeping or sleeping more than usual
  • Significant decrease or increase in appetite (weight loss or gain)
  • Lack of energy, always feeling tired or heavy
  • Physical aches and pains not caused by other medical problems
  • Problems concentrating and making decisions
  • Ongoing difficulties in work, social settings and personal relationships
  • Loss of interest in activities that used to give you pleasure
  • Feeling bad about yourself, low self-worth
  • Feeling hopeless or guilty
  • Thoughts of dying or suicide

 

What to do if you think you are depressed:

  • Get help – depression is a treatable illness and typically improves with therapy and/or medication management

If you have thoughts of suicide – call for help immediately get help now.

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The World Health Organization defines “mental health” “as a state of well-being in which every individual realizes his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to her or his community.” In using this definition, S2i recognizes that some mental health challenges reflect brain diseases that, like physical diseases, require appropriate stigma-free and patient-centered care and include both mental health and substance use disorders. Other mental health challenges stem from social conditions and marginalization and require different forms of interventions.